jump to navigation

Roy Block September 23, 2007

Posted by Melissa Quintanilha in physical interaction design.
add a comment

Roy Block is a project by Sebastian Schmieg, student at Merz Akademie, Stuttgart. It is an experiment with a tangible interface that touches the field of mixed reality.

Audio Cubes May 25, 2007

Posted by Melissa Quintanilha in innovative interfaces, music, physical interaction design.
add a comment

audio-cubes.jpgThis is a Tangible User Interface (TUI) consisting of cubes that contain Digital Signal Processors (DSP) with optical sensors and emitters (infraref and LEDs). These sensors and emitters receive and send audio signals which are generated or processed by the signal processor in the cube.

By positioning the cubes relative to each other and moving them around, a signal processing network can be created. Audio Cubes proposes a new way of interacting with sound and music.

This project was done with Max/MSP: http://www.cycling74.com/story/2007/4/30/132117/165

More information at http://www.percussa.com/

Infolight March 10, 2007

Posted by Melissa Quintanilha in ambient displays, gadgets, innovative interfaces, physical interaction design, remote communication.
add a comment

bt_infolight1.jpgA physical ambient visualization that notifies users of news & information pulled from a personalized online portal using ambient light sequences & sound alerts. The device is equipped with a matrix of 45 LED multicolor pixels, text-to-speech software, movement sensors & WiFi connectivity.
From BT Group

Auraorb ambient notification March 10, 2007

Posted by Melissa Quintanilha in ambient displays, gadgets, innovative interfaces, physical interaction design.
add a comment

auraorb.jpg
AuraOrb is an ambient notification display that deploys “progressive turn taking” techniques to minimize notification disruptions. It uses social awareness cues, such as eye contact to detect user interest in an initially ambient light notification. Once detected, it displays a text message with a notification heading visible from 360 degrees. Touching the orb causes the associated message to be displayed on the user’s computer screen. When user interest is lost, AuraOrb automatically reverts back to its idle state.

More information: http://www.nectar-research.net/news/?p=107

Networked ambient objects March 10, 2007

Posted by Melissa Quintanilha in ambient displays, innovative interfaces, physical interaction design, remote communication.
add a comment

networkedambient.jpg
NYU Interactive Telecommunications Program have been exploring networked ambient visualization devices that allow users to transmit their current mood state to remote friends. Some examples include highlighted emoticons or robotic flowers.

Nabaztag, the Wi-Fi enabled ambient bunny March 3, 2007

Posted by Melissa Quintanilha in ambient displays, gadgets, innovative interfaces, physical interaction design.
add a comment

nabaztag.jpgNabaztag (Armenian for “rabbit”) is a Wi-Fi enabled rabbit, manufactured by Violet. The Nabaztag is a “smart object” that can connect to the Internet (for example to download weather forecasts, read its owner’s email, etc). It is also fully customizable and programmable.

Nabaztag can send and receive MP3s and messages that are read out loud as well as perform the following services (by either speaking the information out loud or using indicative lights): weather forecast, stock market report, news headlines, alarm clock, e-mail alerts, and others.

Some users join the Rabbit’s community by sharing photos of their Nabaztags on flickr, videos on YouTube and DailyMotion. It is also possible to find other rabbits on Google Earth and check all the posts about Nabaztag over at Technorati.

Learn more and watch some fun demos at: www.nabaztag.com

reactable February 18, 2007

Posted by Melissa Quintanilha in innovative interfaces, music, physical interaction design.
add a comment

The reactable is a multi-user electro-acoustic music instrument with a tabletop tangible user interface. Several simultaneous performers share complete control over the instrument by moving physical artefacts on the table surface and constructing different audio topologies in a kind of tangible modular synthesizer or graspable flow-controlled programming language.

The reactable hardware is based on a translucent round table. A video camera situated beneath, continuously analyzes the table surface, tracking the nature, position and orientation of the objects that are distributed on its surface, representing the components of a classic modular synthesizer. These objects are passive without any sensors or actuators, users interact by moving them, changing their position, their orientation or their faces (in the case of volumetric objects). These actions directly control the topological structure and parameters of the sound synthesizer. A projector, also from underneath the table, draws dynamic animations on its surface, providing a visual feedback of the state, the activity and the main characteristics of the sounds produced by the audio synthesizer.

More info: http://www.iua.upf.es/mtg/reacTable/

Basic demo 1:

Basic demo 2:

musicBottles February 18, 2007

Posted by Melissa Quintanilha in innovative interfaces, music, physical interaction design.
add a comment

jazzbottles.gif musicBottles is a project from MIT’s Tangible Media Group. It introduces a tangible interface that deploys bottles as containers and controls for digital information. The system consists of a specially designed table and three corked bottles that “contain” different sounds.

Custom-designed electromagnetic tags embedded in the bottles enable each one to be wirelessly identified. The opening and closing of a bottle is also detected. When a bottle is placed onto the stage area of the table and the cork is removed, the corresponding instrument becomes audible. A pattern of colored light is rear-projected onto the table’s translucent surface to reflect changes in pitch and volume. The interface allows users to structure the experience of the musical composition by physically manipulating the different sound tracks.

More info and videos at: http://tangible.media.mit.edu/projects/musicbottles/

Multi-touch II February 14, 2007

Posted by Melissa Quintanilha in innovative interfaces, physical interaction design.
1 comment so far

Here is how Jeff Han’s multi-touch technology has evolved since last summer.

Physical Interaction Design talk by Prof. Reto Wettach February 13, 2007

Posted by Melissa Quintanilha in physical interaction design, podcast.
add a comment

On August/2006, Professor Reto Wettach from the University of Applied Sciences in Potsdam, Germany, gave a talk on Physical Interaction Design at Carnegie Mellon University.

The podcast of this talk can be found here.