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Chatter Pillow October 10, 2007

Posted by Melissa Quintanilha in ambient displays, gadgets, innovative displays, remote communication.
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chatter-pillow.jpg Some of the most popular items these days are internet-connected objects that contain glanceable information, such as the status of your inbox, the weather, or stock prices.

The “Chatter Pillow” designed by Rebecca Stern, an undergrad at the Parsons School of Design in New York, is a midterm project for her “Making Wireless Toys” class.

The pillow basically allows Stern to stay on IM from her bed or her couch, without the burden of a laptop — one of the pillow’s trio of icons will light up when one of three possible messages are received, so long as they’re sent only from her boyfriend. If he sends “talk to me,” “xo,” or “on my way,” then the icons (pictured) will glow blue accordingly.

Infolight March 10, 2007

Posted by Melissa Quintanilha in ambient displays, gadgets, innovative interfaces, physical interaction design, remote communication.
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bt_infolight1.jpgA physical ambient visualization that notifies users of news & information pulled from a personalized online portal using ambient light sequences & sound alerts. The device is equipped with a matrix of 45 LED multicolor pixels, text-to-speech software, movement sensors & WiFi connectivity.
From BT Group

Auraorb ambient notification March 10, 2007

Posted by Melissa Quintanilha in ambient displays, gadgets, innovative interfaces, physical interaction design.
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auraorb.jpg
AuraOrb is an ambient notification display that deploys “progressive turn taking” techniques to minimize notification disruptions. It uses social awareness cues, such as eye contact to detect user interest in an initially ambient light notification. Once detected, it displays a text message with a notification heading visible from 360 degrees. Touching the orb causes the associated message to be displayed on the user’s computer screen. When user interest is lost, AuraOrb automatically reverts back to its idle state.

More information: http://www.nectar-research.net/news/?p=107

Nabaztag, the Wi-Fi enabled ambient bunny March 3, 2007

Posted by Melissa Quintanilha in ambient displays, gadgets, innovative interfaces, physical interaction design.
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nabaztag.jpgNabaztag (Armenian for “rabbit”) is a Wi-Fi enabled rabbit, manufactured by Violet. The Nabaztag is a “smart object” that can connect to the Internet (for example to download weather forecasts, read its owner’s email, etc). It is also fully customizable and programmable.

Nabaztag can send and receive MP3s and messages that are read out loud as well as perform the following services (by either speaking the information out loud or using indicative lights): weather forecast, stock market report, news headlines, alarm clock, e-mail alerts, and others.

Some users join the Rabbit’s community by sharing photos of their Nabaztags on flickr, videos on YouTube and DailyMotion. It is also possible to find other rabbits on Google Earth and check all the posts about Nabaztag over at Technorati.

Learn more and watch some fun demos at: www.nabaztag.com

Touchscreen iPod? February 1, 2007

Posted by Melissa Quintanilha in gadgets, innovative interfaces, physical interaction design.
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ipod.gifNew patent application from Apple shows a virtual scroll-wheel appearing on top of an iPod interface. So… soon the iPod will only consist of the screen and nothing else. Another time the concept of “invisible interface” coming closer and closer. Anybody doubt they will do it?
http://hrmpf.com/wordpress/54/touch-sensitive-ipod/

Monome January 30, 2007

Posted by Melissa Quintanilha in gadgets, innovative interfaces, music, physical interaction design.
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This example goes along the lines of music creation that i’m speacially interested in.

The monome is a reconfigurable grid of sixty-four backlit buttons.
Buttons can be configured as toggles, radio groupings, sliders, or organized into more sophisticated systems to monitor and trigger sample playback positions, stream 1-bit video, interact with dynamic physical models, and play games. Button press and visual indication are decoupled by design: the correlation is established by each application.
Demonstration video

http://monome.org/

Sfera January 29, 2007

Posted by Melissa Quintanilha in gadgets, physical interaction design.
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sfera_ivrea.jpg

The Sfera is a radio alarm clock which hangs above your bed and wakes you in the morning by forcing you physically to get out of bed. When you set the alarm, the glowing Sfera gradually dims and the music gently fades out as you drift off to sleep. When the alarm chimes in the morning, the only way to silence it is to reach up and gently tap the Sfera. This action initiates the snooze function, but it also makes the Sfera rise above your head towards the ceiling. As it slowly rises away from your reach, you must stretch higher each time to gain another ten minutes of snooze. When it reaches the ceiling, you have no option but to reach for it and drag it back down to your bed – an action which switches off the alarm and forces you finally to get up.

http://courses.interaction-ivrea.it/strangely/a4_hb.html